Saturday, September 6, 2014

Bowling: The Sport That's An Exact Science?

"All exact science is dominated by the idea of approximation." -Bertrand Russell

There is a mindset that tends to prevail in the bowling world.

This may be what's working against me and preventing me from getting to the next level of my game.

Try recalling the bowling conversations you've had recently and tell me that this mindset hasn't dominated the talk.

Here's the mindset: "Everything is exact."

Here's the statements:

"I hit my mark exactly where I wanted to."

"I threw the ball exactly the same way as I did last frame."

"The ball hit the pocket exactly where it's supposed to be for a strike."

Now, let's see, we tend to believe that we're doing the same thing over and over on the bowling lanes; yet, we can't sign our signature exactly the same way each time?

We think we're hitting a board "dead on" when it's approximately 1.0641025 inches wide and we're throwing a ball that has a diameter of 8.500 to 8.595 inches?

We're looking at our mark from a distance of 11 to 12 feet away (if you're aiming for the arrows) looking down at the mark from however tall you are.)

We're falling all over the place so our release is not coming from a stable platform?

And, our head is bouncing around as we lurch up, down, forward, or side-ways?

The point I'm trying to make is that we're not as exact as we like to think we are.

In fact, there are no exacts in the sport of bowling nor in the world, exactly.

Which brings me to this article's "Choc-List" when you can't seem to strike and must make adjustments:

1) IT'S NOT YOU. When you're stringing strike after strike, "everything" falls. It's not because you're throwing every shot exactly the same, each-and-every-time. It means you're in the "sweet spot" for this game, series, or this moment. If you start leaving single pins, the spot has moved (or you never were in the correct spot in the first place.) Move, because It's not you.

2) MOVE MORE THAN ONE BOARD. Depending on who's on the lanes with you, what line they're playing, and what types of balls they're using, the lanes will change differently. One board of change may not be enough to overcome the amount of oil depletion that's occurred. If it doesn't work, you can always move back or somewhere else.

3) THE LINE CHANGES AFTER EVERY BALL. Even if you're the only bowler on the lane, your reactive resin ball will be taking oil off the lane surface or moving it around after every throw. If you're using a plastic or urethane ball, oil still comes off although at a slower pace. Anyway, expect the lane to change after every ball thrown.

4) IT MIGHT WORK NOW. If you tried something in practice or earlier in the match, don't discount trying it again later in the game or series. There are no definitive studies about how a lane will play after oil depletion. 16 people will have 16 different reactions. It might not have worked earlier but, it might work now.

This is the exact end, approximately.

See you on the lanes.